• 10% of Net-Profits Donated to Support Bears

  • Our organic, vegan gummy bears are good for you, and good for bears. Now that's a win-win!
  • 10% of Net-Profits Donated to Support Bears

  • Our organic, vegan gummy bears are good for you, and good for bears. Now that's a win-win!

10% of Net-Profits Donated to Support Bears

Our organic, vegan gummy bears are good for you, and good for bears. Now that's a win-win! Shop Now

10% of Net-Profits Donated to Support Bears

Our organic, vegan gummy bears are good for you, and good for bears. Now that's a win-win! Shop Now
  • Polar bears are the world’s biggest land carnivores. The largest on record was found in Alaska and weighed 2,200 pounds - that’s over a ton!
  • The soles of a polar bear’s feet have small papillae and vacuoles that act like suction cups to make them less likely to slip on the ice.
  • Female polar bears are about half the size of males and normally weigh 440 to 660 pounds, but can exceed 1,100 pounds when pregnant due to stored fat.
  • In late spring, wind and currents create cracks in the Arctic sea ice that concentrate the seals that polar bears hunt.
  • Climate change represents the largest threat to polar bears because they need Arctic sea ice in order to hunt.
  • In areas where the ice melts completely during the late summer and fall, polar bears spend those months resting on land and waiting for the freeze-up.
  • The farthest south that polar bears live all year round is James Bay in Canada, which is about the same latitude as London, England.
  • Polar bears have low reproductive rates. Most female polar bears only reproduce once every three years with small litters of typically two cubs.
  • Polar bears are the most carnivorous of all bears and eat almost exclusively seals during the winter.
  • Despite their striking appearance, panda bears actually have excellent camoflage. Their white and black coat blends in very well with their snowy enviorment.
  • Panda bears are excellent swimmers and are also great at climbing trees.
  • Panda bears use an extended wrist bone like a thumb to help them grip food.
  • Pandas spend much of their time eating or looking for food, around 10-16 hours per day!
  • A panda's diet is 99% comprised of vegetation (almost exclusively bamboo). However, since their digestive system is typical of a carnivore, the remaining 1% of their diet can include eggs, small animals and carrion.
  • Pandas sometimes do handstands when they pee. They will climb a tree backwards with their hind feet first, allowing them to to leave their scent higher up.
  • The sun bear is the world's smallest bear, weighing between 55-143lbs.
  • Ironically, sun bears are nocturnal.
  • The sun bear is named for the white/golden crescent shape on its chest, which is said to resemble the rising sun.
  • Brown bears will nurse their young for up to 3 years, which varies based on how long the cubs are dependent on the mother's milk.
  • Brown bears can be identified by the large hump on their back, an extra muscle that helps them dig for food and excavate dens for hibernation in the winter.
  • Grizzly bears, kodiak bears and brown bears are all the same species (Ursus arctos), though kodiak bears and grizzly bears are currently considered to be separate subspecies.
  • The sloth bear is native to India, Sri Lanka and Nepal. It relies largely on ants and termites as a food source.
  • Sloth bears are the only species of bear known to routinely carry cubs on their backs.
  • The north american black bear is the most common species of bear in North America, followed by brown bears and polar bears.
  • The spectacled bear got its name because of markings on its face that look like glasses, though not all spectacled bears display this characteristic trait.
  • The spectacled bear is the only bear species native to South America.
  • The specticaled bear is mostly vegetarian, though about 5% of their diet consists of meat.
  • Throughout most of the year male polar bears are solitary individuals, but are known to become quite social during summer months.
  • Polar bears have large overlapping home ranges but do not defend territories.
  • Polar bears usually give birth to twin cubs. Although litters of three or more cubs have been documented, they are not as prevalent.
  • Polar bear cubs typically stay with their mothers for about 2.5 years, which is why most female polar bears only reproduce once every three years.
  • Female polar bears' infrequent reproductive cycle leads to intense competition for mates among males.
  • The hair shafts in polar bear fur are actually hollow.
  • Polar bears don't like to run far distances. Running polar bears can easily overheat because of their large size, stored fat, and thick, insulating fur.
  • During winter, when the polar ice pack extends further south, some polar bears move as far south as Newfoundland - returning north as it recedes in summer.
  • Only pregnant polar bears den for extended periods. Their heart rate and temperature do not decrease as much as other hibernating bears, which helps cubs stay warm.
  • Polar bear cubs have fluffier fur that provides better insulation in dry air, but does not keep them as warm when wet.
  • Polar bears are considered marine mammals (like seals, whales, and otters). They are the only bear species that is labeled as a marine mammal.
  • Under all the white fur, polar bear skin is actually black.
  • There are nineteen different populations of polar bears worldwide.
  • Polar bears can't see the color green due to their dichromatic vision (humans have trichromatic vision), and evolutionarily don't need to given their Arctic environment.
  • Just like most people, most polar bears sleep 7-8 hours at a stretch—and are known to take naps too.
  • Polar bears are strong swimmers, they use their large front paws to paddle, and hold their hind legs flat like a rudder.
  • Polar bears can't see the color green due to their dichromatic vision (humans have trichromatic vision), and evolutionarily don't need to given their Arctic environment.
  • The farthest south that polar bears live all year round is James Bay in Canada, which is about the same latitude as London, England.

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